I hate to break it to you but almost all food needs some type of preparing. That’s why a typical kitchen contains dozens of different gadgets to “help”. In my inherited kitchen I counted 100 gadgets to do with cooking, excluding cutlery, crockery and tea towels. That’s more “useful tools” than I have in my shed! Apparently some of my friends kitchens have much more than 100 gadgets. Lakeland (a kitchen & home store) sell over 4,000 different products so obviously there is lots of things to choose from.

Why?

One explanation could be that cooks simply like buying stuff. Another is that some recipes require a gadget that you don’t have. Having bought the appropriate new kitchen gadget cooks might only use it once (if indeed it’s ever used) but cooks tend to keep things “just in case”. You will be pleased to hear that only about 20 kitchen tools are needed for most My Inherited Kitchen recipes. Feel a bit better now? Good. Here is your next task – if your cook is not coming back.

What kitchen tools do you already have?

Before you start make sure that your phone is charged because you will want to take  pictures of some things in your collection. Now make yourself a cup of tea because this could take some time. It’s a bit like rummaging through your tool box or searching the internet, you will get distracted.

Just as you did with sorting out the food start with just one cupboard or drawer at a time. Take everything out even if it looks a bit yucky. Put everything into three piles.

Pile 1. Things you recognise and can roughly work out what they could be used for
Pile 2. Items that you have no idea what they do and/or how to use them
Pile 3. Stuff that is broken, damaged or you just don’t like

Now get a black rubbish bag and throw everything in pile 3 into it. It’s your kitchen now and you’re allowed to do it. Next congratulate yourself for the large number of items in pile 1. You are obviously starting to pick up some valuable knowledge.

What about pile 2?

Don’t be tempted just to put everything back in the cupboard. If you do you will most probably never take it out again. So make another cup of tea and sit down. Pick up each item one at a time and let your imagination run wild about what it could be used for. This can be a fun thing to do but don’t let you mind wander too far from cooking.

Place roughly recognised items into pile 1 and take phone pictures of each remaining item in pile 2. You can now ask friends and family what they think they are by showing them the pictures. You’ll soon discover that they don’t know all of them either. Perhaps you have just discovered a new party game? Hmm – perhaps not.

Now put everything in pile 1 back in the cupboards and drawers where you think that you will be able to easily find them in the future. Leave out the remaining unidentified pile 2 gadgets and then throw them away. Yes you can throw away things that are not broken but you will never use. Honest!

Finally

Before you finally put everything away check that you have all of these things. If you don’t it might mean that you need to go, dare I mention the word,  SHOPPING.